Erith, Rewritten

KentSouth East

Erith is one of the remaining pockets of former
council estate homes in Bexley. Ithas traditionally been a dumping ground for
former residents of the local mental hospital, single mothers, care leavers and
those with a history of anti-social behaviour, such as alcoholism and drug
abuse.

Many who live in Erith are there because they were told by the council it was their only option.

The local primary schools are at the bottom of the league table. Transport is
poor as there are economic barriers including the Thames,
and a railway line with few crossings. A new bridge (Thames Gateway) and road
widening schemes will turn a busy dual carriage way into practically a
motorway, with little benefit for local residents. It is surrounded by
industrial zoning.

As one might imagine, anyone who can afford to leave generally does so. Those
remaining are obviously socially disadvantaged, either they can’t leave but
want to (Bexley imported many thousands of out of borough residents despite
severe housing pressure for cash) and cannot transfer, or cannot exchange because
nobody wants to move there. Mortgage is out of the question, good jobs come
with good connections and (possibly) a good education, neither of which are
available.

To call people chavs was funny to start with, but now seems to be a term of
abuse.

The chav concept is a way of one socioeconomic group of separating itself from
the one below, and the class war in Britain thus continues.

Demonising and dehumanising one social group, with little in the way of
prospects, quality of life or options, to make oneself feel better or
superior is utterly craven and repulsive.

Always remember, there is always someone or some group with something you
don’t, whether it be more wealth, class, power, influence, charisma, or indeed
compassion.

It is the duty of all those who consider themselves both decent and human to
give some understanding and compassion to those less advantaged than
themselves.

Futhermore, the average person should not be stereotyped due to where they
live. It is a lazy assumption.

What people call chav is a sign of disenfranchisement.







Top 10 worst places to live in England 2019